Chandler Branch's Blog

Katzenstein Concert

Lawrence Katzenstein chats with a St. Louis executive newbie (me) at the St. Louis Business Journal’s May 2012 dinner event celebrating the city’s Top 150 Privately Held Companies. Photo courtesy of the St. Louis Business Journal.Lawrence Katzenstein chats with a St. Louis executive newbie (me) at the St. Louis Business Journal’s May 2012 dinner event celebrating the city’s Top 150 Privately Held Companies. Photo courtesy of the St. Louis Business Journal.Last Thursday I visited Powel Hall and took part in a great St. Louis tradition, one that I suspect is largely unknown to most St. Louisans, despite its 20-year history. Thompson Coburn trusts and estates attorney Lawrence Katzenstein led the St. Louis Symphony as conductor in a program that featured Tchaikovsky’s beloved Romeo and Juliet Fantasy-Overture (if you don’t know this piece, give it one listen and you’ll know why it’s such a well-loved work) and Saint-Saëns' Piano Concerto No. 2 in G minor, with piano soloist Patti Wolf. Both works are real crowd pleasers, and just as pleasing as the music was the price of admission: $0. That’s right, the Katzenstein concert is an annual gift to the city, one that I look forward to enjoying again in the future.


From the look on the conductor’s face last week, it’s debatable who was enjoying the program more, him or his audience! As he relayed in the program notes, this concert is the conductor’s “musical version of a baseball fantasy camp.” Lawrence Katzenstein would tell you outright that he’s not a conductor. But I think there’s more than a little modesty behind that statement. He certainly knew what he was doing on the podium at Powell Hall last week. The concert was a delight and I’m glad to have crossed paths with Mr. Katzenstein at a St. Louis Business Journal event earlier this year, otherwise I might not have known about it. I’ll keep tabs on plans for next year’s concert and will be sure to post details as they become available.

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